DESIGN CONCEPT AND STYLE BOARDS

DARK CITY

PERSONAL TASTE BOARDS - MENSWEAR AND WOMENSWEAR

The below boards were an exercise in conveying the aesthetics and fashion of modern menswear and womenswear that inspires me.

Male Taste Board
Female Taste Board

KING LEAR

kinglearmood_edited.jpg

INTO THE WOODS

The below is a design proposal for a commercial theatrical production of Stephen Sondheim's Into the Woods that fuses modern high fashion inspired by historical aesthetics with fantasy and period pieces.

Into the Woods Mood Board

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME

The below board was an initial design proposal for Disney's musical The Hunchback of Notre Dame that sought to explore the line between representing the darker, more adult tone of the musical with the character designs and palettes of the classic Disney film that audiences have grown to love. My proposal aimed to further blend 15th century references with the 19th century illustrations and interpretations of the 15th century from Victor Hugo's classic novel.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame Mood Board.jpg

Below are several more examples of initial design concept and style boards made for various classes in my time at graduate school. Through these you can get a better sense for my initial approach to design conceptualization and palette building. 

The below boards are for a redesign of the 1998 film Dark City. The first board is to convey the overall mood, palette, and environment of my redesign, and the second board is an overview of the aesthetics for "The Strangers," the insectoid alien antagonists in the film.

Dark City Mood Board
The Strangers Aesthetic

This production of King Lear plays out in a pseudo-modern, sharp, dark, austere, and luxe world. The palette is primarily monochromatic, shades of greys with cool blue grey tones defining those characters who challenge the ruling powers. My design emulates aspects of our reality, incorporating a blend of high fashion and militarized aesthetics. I represent the thematic interplay of masculinity and femininity through crisp angular lines and silhouettes on the ruling regime versus looser, unstructured, and draping forms on those who challenge corruption, and on the lower classes. While my design does not explicitly model any specific ruler or country, its aesthetic references underscore how relevant these themes remain—asking an audience to examine the parallels within our world today and supporting Shakespeare’s moralization of corruption and power.